Is Your Loved One Developing Alzheimer’s Disease?

  |     |   Alzheimer's, Dementia, Memory Care

Joseph Coupal 

Alzheimer’s Disease Symptoms

Part of Alzheimer’s disease awareness is knowing the symptoms so you can know whether a loved one may be developing it. The symptoms include:

  • Memory Loss – People may forget things they’ve learned as well as dates and events. They may also ask for the same information over and over again.
  • Trouble Planning or Solving Problems – You may notice a loved one taking longer to complete tasks they used to be able to do much quicker. You may also notice they have trouble following directions, even a simple recipe becomes complex.
  • Confusion with Time or Place – People with Alzheimer’s often lose track of time. They also forget where they are and even how they got there.
  • Misplacing Things & Unable to Retrace Steps – As people forget dates and events they may also start to misplace objects. Although they would be able to retrace their steps in the past and find what they were looking for, that is no longer the case. This may lead them to accuse others of stealing because they can no longer find what’s theirs.
  • Mood & Personality Changes – Because of the changes that are going on in their mind, you may notice major shifts in mood and personality. They may become confused, suspicious and even depressed.

Helping People with Alzheimer’s Disease

  • Although there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, there are things you can do to help a loved one, especially if the disease is still in its early stages.
  • Keep a Daily Routine – This helps to avoid confusion and lets the person know what can be expected. Alzheimer’s patients like routines.
  • Don’t Overstimulate – Keep things simple. Say one thing at a time. Present only one idea so that the person can understand it the best they can.
  • Be Reassuring – Always try to make the person feel safe and comfortable. Sometimes even saying the words, “You are safe with me” is enough to make that person feel at ease.
  • Don’t Yell or Argue – As frustrated as you may get, imagine how the patient feels. They can no longer grasp what is going on inside their own heads. Don’t yell or argue out of frustration. Be the calming voice they need.

While you may be able to care for an Alzheimer’s patient in the early stages of the disease, doing so as it progresses can become more challenging. Many times the patient can present a danger to himself by wandering off or forgetting to turn off the stove. If this is the case it may be time to consider a memory care facility that can monitor and manage the patient.

For more information on memory care, contact Spring Arbor.
 

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